Episode 5


Episode 5



Episode Transcript
Starting now. Commonalities where guests find common ground through uncommon conversations, politics, religion, finances, all the topics your grandmother told you not to discuss with friends. And now your host, Matthew Dowling, and today's guests on commonalities. Well, thanks for joining us today on the FDS five 90 am 1 0 1 fm, and everywhere. That you download your, uh, favorite podcasts. I'm your host Matt Dowling on commonalities alongside, uh, today's guest, Natalie Duval. Uh, and Natalie is an author and, uh, and has, uh, a couple different pieces in publication. Natalie, why don't you tell us, uh, a little bit about yourself and, uh, and about, uh, what you have going on. Hey, thank you, Matt. Um, and thank you for having me here. Um, you and I met, I think 15 years ago, something like that. Um, maybe 12 or something, right when we, when I was published in my first kind of anthology. Um, so I'm a, a Jacqueline of all trades kind of. Um, I'm a published short story writer. I also do write some nonfiction, especially now I'm a teacher and the director of an ed program. So now I do a little, um, kind of writing in those fields as well. Um, and also, you know, I think, you know, I just got off a term of school board last year when I write novel length books. I do write romance, um, but my short stories, you know, cover the gamut of things. And my last published one was in a charity anthology called like Sunshine After the Rain. And that was more like a women's fiction short story. Now, you also, uh, professionally work as a educator, isn't that correct? Yes, I'm a high school English teacher. Yep. So, uh, molding young minds, uh, you know, never easy work. Uh, I'm sure, uh, I'm sure you may, uh, bring with you some, uh, opinions about, uh, about education or how things, uh, perhaps could be done, um, maybe better in some of our areas. Uh, any of those ideas you'd like to share with us today? Well, you know, I think about, I think a lot of people talk about right, the school system and wishing it could be better, but I'm sure you know the statistics on it too. When you pull individual communities, most communities are actually really happy with their school system. So we have this weird dynamic, whereas it's almost like the country as a whole is saying, Hey, we need to change the school system, but that at an individual level, we're actually quite happy with it. And I think that sometimes gets in our way. I think we do need to be moving towards more, and I'll use this word, I know this is a word that maybe I shouldn't use because it's almost inflammatory, but a more progressive type of school system. Um, and I mean that as progressive and we need to rethink how we grade. We need to rethink how we promote students kind of things. But as a country, I don't think parents wanna do that. I don't think parents wanna say, Hey, maybe we should reconsider if age is really how we consider when a student's ready for a grade level or something like that. Or that maybe the numeric grading system or percentage grading system. Maybe that's not something that's helpful. And I don't know what your thoughts are on that too, you know, you're kind of, you know, dealing with the parental end as well. So. Yeah, I I mean, you definitely see that, uh, each learner is different, um, in the way they handle each discipline and what's right for one student is not necessarily right for, um, for another student. And I see that just with my two kids that are less than two years, um, difference in age from each other. Um, they have unique needs and, uh, and so parents have to partner with educators to make sure those, uh, unique needs are, are maybe being met. Yeah, yeah, I agree with that. And I think too, I think on kind of a similar note to that, this day and age, we really are seeing a big push. Like, I don't know if you see these memes all the time, it's like, why do I need algebra? And I think we're actually starting to push away from some of the things that are core to being a well educated person. And I, I talk to my students about it all the time. You know, I'll say something like, here's a spreadsheet I created so you guys could compare your grades. And I used math to do that. And I think sometimes it came from a good idea that we're trying to push kids into career fields, but I think we're also then kind of losing some of the joy of just learning for learning's sake. And I think that might be why some joy is coming out careers. We really do need to focus on that. We really do. How can we focus on that and make kids still have joy in learning other things that maybe they won't use or maybe that they will use decades down the road and they don't know it yet. Well, and, and, uh, maybe I'll take some, um, ownership, while I'm not proud of this, um, as kind of a political mindset that would come from, from where I am on the, uh, on the political spectrum, um, but there's almost a, um, a bad, uh, connotation that goes with academia. And, and I really hate to see that, um, you know, because academia is not a, a negative thing. We have amazing discoveries, um, and we've moved forward as a society because people have taken time to, uh, to further educate themselves or to do research, uh, et cetera. And, uh, we live in a society that wants to demonize that academia sometimes. Yeah. Yeah. I will say, you know, when I ran for school board the first time five years ago, I kind of promoted myself that I have my doctorate in education and that I was familiar with multiple aspects of the educational system. And this last time when I ran, um, for reelection and I lost, I actually got attacked quite a bit on being mocked that, you know, I'm a doctor of education, so I think that therefore I am better than you know, the other people. And it, it kind of took me aback in that, to be honest, um, that it was kind of this pushback against, um, my degree. Yeah. And we don't ever wanna, uh, hold against hold education against an individual. It's, it's something that, um, can only help them to, uh, to further themselves or their organization as it would be. Yeah. Yeah. My students and I were talking about that this week because we're reading Dracula and in Dracula there's one American, and he's described as the stereotypical American, and he's described as well educated. And I think in the United States, we should take pride that education is so important to us. Don't you think? Like that is one of the things that makes us really, I think, stand out, that we try to make sure that every single one of our students has access to fair education. Well, I think it's time we get our first break in. Uh, that'll just take a moment or two when we come back. I'd like to discuss, uh, a little bit about your writing style and, uh, what motivates you to write and, uh, about some of the things that you haven't print right now. So we'll be back as soon as we recognize those that have helped pay for today's, uh, program. You're listening to commonalities where guests find common ground through uncommon conversations. We'll be back after this brief break to recognize our sponsors. When it comes to buying a home, what you see isn't exactly what you get. That's why home buyers should call Dave Dowling at Grandview Inspections at 7 2 4 2 0 8 4 1 0 8. You'll see colorful flowers, freshly painted walls, granite countertops, fleeing hardwood floors, and other touches. What you can't see is the cracks, ancient plumbing, dangerous wiring, or broken appliances that might be revealed when you hire a home inspector. And when it comes to home inspectors, knowing yours has the qualifications and experience needed, should be your number one concern. Dave Dowling with Grand View Inspections is an architectural engineer with over 30 years of commercial construction experience and hundreds of inspections under his belt. A home inspection is an opportunity for you to hire an expert to walk through the home and prepare a report outlining the home's major components. What needs immediate attention and what will require maintenance after you move in Your home is one of your biggest investments. So make sure your investment is everything you hoped it to be. Call Dave Dowling at Grandview Inspections at 7 2 4 2 0 8 4 1 0 8. Is your business using analog strategies in a digital marketing world? If so, then contact Matthew or Rebecca Dowling at Coordinated 360 for a professional consultation where we bring in depth knowledge and functional expertise with a holistic perspective. Coordinated 360 provides digital marketing, paid ad and media buying services, web design, social media management, video production, and more for businesses, organizations, and political campaigns with decades of experience. Matt and Becky at Coordinated 360 can help you craft your unique message and share it with the world. For a no risk media evaluation and recommendations, call 7 2 4 3 2 0 22 12, or visit us online at www.coordinatedthreesixty.com. Find us also on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, or email info coordinated three sixty.com. Are you enjoying the program? You're listening to support commonalities and help keep us on the air by making a donation of five, 10, or $25, or any amount you feel comfortable sharing [email protected] Again, that is donate.commonalities.online on the worldwide web, buy our host a cup of coffee or help pay for airtime at Donate dot commonalities online. Founded in 1991, bright Stripe has succeeded on the premises of quality work done right at an affordable cost. At Bright Stripe personal service has always been a must. We strive to be the premier asphalt ceiling and striping company in the region. Matt George, the owner of Bright Stripe llc, brings experience from his construction and maintenance company, mountain Creek Construction and Maintenance. Matt has provided excellent customer service to many happy businesses and homeowners. Brights Stripe is the premier provider of seal coating or pavement ceiling. The process of applying a protective coating to asphalt based pavements to provide a layer of protection from the elements, water, oils, and UV damage. They also specialize in driveway and parking lot. Crack ceiling. Crack ceiling is the process of applying a protective coating to asphalt beef pavements, brights stripe, also abides by all safety laws and standards in line striping and layout for a no obligation estimate, contact Bright Stripe at 7 2 4 4 3 7 6 0 9 0. Well, you're listening to Commonality is on WBS Radio five 90 am 1 0 1 0.1 fm, and every place you download your favorite podcast, I'm your host, Matt Dowling, alongside our guest for today, Natalie Deval. Uh, and we've talked about the educational, um, status here in the United States and some of the problems that, uh, that we're seeing. Um, but we wanted to talk to you a little bit about, um, being an author and some of the work that you've done in the past. And, um, kind of, uh, a little bit about, uh, what someone who may be interested in starting to write, um, should do. Yeah, sounds great. Um, my most recent, we talked a little bit about it before we got together, um, live here, but my most recent work is in the charity anthology, like Sunshine After Rain. It is by a publishing company that I love. It's called Raw Dog Screaming Press. The editor is also an editor I love Heidi Ruby Miller. And this is an interesting one. This was a solicited anthology. So the editor Heidi, um, reached out and asked certain people to contribute to the anthology. And it's an interesting process, right? Because when someone asks you to write for them, you're like, yes, of course, because it takes out all the, the stress and pain of submitting and going through that kind of thing. But then the call's very specific, the word length, the, you know, thematic kind of ideas of the story. And so I immediately said yes to Heidi, and then I had to think, well, what on earth am I gonna write about? Um, and the premise, this was a charity anthology, um, to help, um, a friend, um, with a cancer diagnosis. So the, the premise was, you know, it's called like sunshine after rain. So the premise is something that overcomes, and I was like, I don't, that's not the kind of thing I write. I really am a romance kind of writer. And then, you know, I was just outside looking at our backyard and all the spotted lantern flies that were just bothering me, bothering our trees and everything like that. And I kind of took a story about a single mother killing spotted lantern flies. And I am not a single mother. I have the best husband in the world, I really do, and I have three really great children. But I took, what would it be like to have children similar to mine, doing similar incidents that mine do, like fighting over a bag of chips, and how that would just really almost be like a triggering moment of someone who's trying to kill spotted lantern flies, right? It's like pushing that rock back up the hill again and again and again. So that's how that story came to be. And it's, it's just interesting how, how those kind of stories generate themselves when it's nothing like, nothing like you would normally write, nothing you would've ever thought to write. Just the inspiration we get from the normal world. And hopefully one day when my own children read the story, they'll know that though I took inspiration from them, I'm not basing the character's emotional feelings about her children on how she, how I feel about them. Yeah. And, and you know, it, it is so interesting that you pulled that inspiration from, um, the day to day life of the Spotter Lantern fly. And, uh, you know, I, I think about, uh, some of my background in the last couple years and, um, how I've seen, um, the Spotted Lantern fly now, uh, start to move into our area. Of course, that's a non-indigenous, um, uh, fly that, uh, that came over on, uh, presumably container ships, uh, to the United States. It can be very harmful. Uh, you know, for the last several years I've represented, uh, Somerset County where they make, um, maple syrup, uh, on the same, uh, level and, uh, with the same volume as, as maybe Vermont. And people don't realize that at some point in time, but that, uh, spotted lantern fly can be extremely dangerous to, uh, to those trees that are out in that area. Um, we also, I remember a couple years ago, uh, running for office and knocking on doors and, uh, the cicadas were out and, uh, you heard them crunch, crunch, crunch after, after walking down the, so, you know, it is, uh, strange how we pull things from everyday life like that. Yeah. You know, one of my earlier anthologies, I had a story and I was, I remember the story and I, I would not tell you to read it now, but I was trying to moralize, so I was, was trying to, you know, give this moral message. And I don't think that story, that kind of metaphorical story was as good as the story that I just took from the mundane and tried to make it in life. So it's often interesting. I think that's something that when we mature as a writer, and of course I'm not a mature writer at all, but when we, you know, kind of develop and keep writing and writing, writing, we see that sometimes, you know, we used to try to, we used to try to make these grand gestures in writing, and, and I don't do that anymore, and I think I'm better because of that. So that's a, a tip or a piece of advice that you would pass on to those that are, uh, just starting out. Yeah, I would, I, I really think it's, don't you think it's something of youth that we wanna have this big impact and we wanna try really hard? Um, and I think sometimes the harder you try, the more difficult it is. So going more simplest, staying to, it's trite, but saying more to what you know and what you experience helps kind of, those things come out more than when you're trying really hard to. Sure, sure. And, uh, and, you know, and I, I think that's, uh, that is, that's great advice. Um, sometimes we work, uh, too hard to, to build things up to a level, uh, that just, you know, isn't natural. And, uh, and you can pull from those everyday experiences. Yeah. Yeah. I agree. Well, we have to get one more break in here before, uh, the end of the program. When we come back, I wanna talk a little bit about, uh, what is in your future, do you have any new pieces that you'll be working on or that you're starting to think about? Um, and, uh, and then we will get our final thoughts in for today's program, but we'll be back right after this. You're listening to commonalities where guests find common ground through uncommon conversations. We'll be back after this brief break to recognize our sponsors. When it comes to buying a home, what you see isn't exactly what you get. That's why home buyers should call Dave Dowling at Grandview Inspections at 7 2 4 2 0 8 4 1 0 8. You'll see colorful flowers, freshly painted walls, granite countertops, gleaming hardwood floors, and other touches. What you can't see is the cracks, ancient plumbing, dangerous wiring, or broken appliances that might be revealed when you hire a home inspector. And when it comes to home inspectors, knowing yours has the qualifications and experience needed, should be your number one concern. Dave Dowling with Grand View Inspections is an architectural engineer with over 30 years of commercial construction experience and hundreds of inspections under his belt. A home inspection is an opportunity for you to hire an expert to walk through the home and prepare a report outlining the home's major components. What needs immediate attention and what will require maintenance after you move in Your home is one of your biggest investments. So make sure your investment is everything you hoped it to be. Call Dave Dowling at Grandview Inspections at 7 2 4 2 0 8 4 1 0 8. Is your business using analog strategies in a digital marketing world? If so, then contact Matthew or Rebecca Dowling at Coordinated 360 for a professional consultation where we bring in-depth knowledge and functional expertise with a holistic perspective. Coordinated 360 provides digital marketing, paid ad and media buying services, web design, social media management, video production, and more for businesses, organizations, and political campaigns with decades of experience. Matte and Becky at Coordinated 360 can help you craft your unique message and share it with the world. For a no risk media evaluation and recommendations, call 7 2 4 3 2 0 22 12, or visit us online at www.coordinatedthreesixty.com. Find us also on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, or email info coordinated three sixty.com. Are you enjoying the program? You're listening to support commonalities and help keep us on the air by making a donation of five, 10, or $25, or any amount you feel comfortable sharing [email protected] Again, that is donate.commonalities.online on the worldwide web, buy our host a cup of coffee or help pay for airtime at Donate dot commonalities online. Founded in 1991, brights Stripe has succeeded on the premises of quality work done right at an affordable cost. At Bright Stripe personal service has always been a must. We strive to be the premier asphalt ceiling and striping company in the region. Matt George, the owner of Bright Stripe llc, brings experience from his construction and maintenance company, mountain Creek Construction and Maintenance. Matt has provided excellent customer service to many happy businesses and homeowners. Bright Stripe is the premier provider of seal coating or pavement ceiling. The process of applying a protective coating to asphalt based pavements to provide a layer of protection from the elements, water, oils, and UV damage. They also specialize in, in driveway and parking lot. Crack ceiling. Crack ceiling is the process of applying a protective coating to asphalt based pavements. Bright stripe also abides by all safety laws and standards in line striping and layout for a no obligation estimate, contact Bright Stripe at 7 2 4 4 3 7 6 0 9 0. Well, you are listening to commonalities on WBS Radio five 90 am 1 0 1 0.1 fm, and every place you download your favorite podcasts, I'm with author Natalie Duval. And, uh, Natalie, before we went to break, we started to, uh, started to kind of veer in the direction of the future. And, uh, I wanted to know, you know, are there, uh, some projects that you may have that you're working on and, uh, planning on in the future? Yeah, there are two things right now. I've ventured into poetry, so I'm writing at least one poem a week. Um, I am not, like, I would not say there are some people, man, they just spew out poetic language. I really have to struggle and work hard for it. So it's been a great challenge and I am sending out so many poems right now and getting so many rejections that it's been wonderful. Um, and then I also have what I almost call kind of like my, um, Outlander Diana Gabel Don, um, project. I'm finally writing down a book that I've just loved the story for ages, but is not necessarily, I don't know if you know the background of Outlander, when she submitted the novel, she got rejected oodles of time just because it was so different than everything else. So that's when I'm kind of working on, I'm kind of getting away from, you know, kind of the, the format or formula of most ro most romance novels that are being published and doing more of a fantasy type piece. So I'm working on both of those things right now, and honestly, I'm just enjoying writing and that's just nice <laugh>. It's just nice to enjoy writing. You know, you spoke a little bit about, uh, getting those rejection letters back from the publishers. Um, you know, how does that deal on with one's psyche and, you know, how do you accept that kind of, that feedback as a gift perhaps, um, and, uh, and use it to improve and, and to, uh, to make things better in the future? Well, I think you have to go through that initial period of thinking, I'm gonna send this out, and I'm gonna be that person who gets this bidding more, coming over their work that first time they send it out. Because I think you need to realize that really only happens to like one person, and it, it knocks you down and then it takes a little while. I've had some great mentors that really talk about how success is getting a rejection letter, because that means you're one step closer to being accepted. And I've seen that in my own career. When I got my agent, he initially had, um, he had rejected the piece, I wrote him and said, but hey, if you ever write anything again, send it to me. And I sent it to you. And if I had taken that rejection from him on what at the time was a terrible novel, if I had taken that rejection to heart and never sent him my next novel, I would've never gotten my first agent. So I really, I think I'm at a place now where really I want an acceptance, but a rejection is like, I'm one step closer and I'm doing what I need to do, so I'm being successful in really what's the hardest part, which is writing and sending. And uh, and, and I guess, you know, just utilizing that feedback is, uh, is something that, that helps you ultimately on the journey of improving. Yeah. And every time, you know, every time you look at something you've written, I know you know this too. Every time you re look at something you've written, when time has passed, you have new eyes and you can come back refreshed and you can alter it and you can make it better. Absolutely. And, and you know, I know I've looked at things that I've written in the past and, uh, really questioned was that me inside, uh, inside that shell. But, uh, it was writing at the moment because things do, uh, change a great bit from, from time to time. They really do. So before we get to the, before we get to the end of today's program, I want to give you an opportunity to get, uh, your contact information out there. If someone is interested in reading something that you've written, um, or if they wanna learn more about you professionally, how can they go about doing that? You can find me. I know a lot of people at use Facebook. I have my writer's page, which is Natalie Duval's Writer's page, and I also have my educational page, which is Educational Overhaul with Dr. Duval. So both of those, Natalie Duval's writer Page and Educational Overhaul with Dr. Duval. You can also email me on the email I use for all my writing, which is Natt 4 4 4 gmail. Okay. Natalie, thank you so much for being with us today and joining us for commonalities this show where guests, uh, find uncommon conversations and, uh, common ground. Through those, we wanna thank you for being a guest with us today. And, uh, we hope that you take care and have a great holiday season. This has been commonalities, a show where guests find common ground through uncommon conversations. Copyright 2022 Coordinated 360, all public rebroadcast should be done with prior written approval from Matthew Dowling. All requests should be sent to [email protected] Thank you for listening to commonalities.

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