Episode 12 - #TalkPolitics


Episode 12 - #TalkPolitics


On Thursday, we sit down with Zigmund Reichenbach (@zreichenbach1) an unrepentant political commentator, student of philosophy, and individual who is disgusted by fear mongering, war, and big government. Zig hosts the podcast Talk Politics where he is looking to create engaging political discussions!


Episode Transcript
Starting now. Commonalities where guests find common ground through uncommon conversations, politics, religion, finances, all the topics your grandmother told you not to discuss with friends. And now your host, Matthew Dowling. And today's guests commonalities. Thanks for joining us on another episode of Commonalities. I'm your host, Matt Dowling, and my guest today is Zigman Reichenbach. And, uh, Zig, why don't you go ahead and, uh, give a little bit of your background in a self introduction to the listeners, uh, that are out there at home. Hey, good evening, listeners have commonalities. My name is Zigmund Reichenbach. I work as a grassroots engagement director with Americans for Prosperity. I'm not here speaking on behalf of them today, just speaking here as a independent commentator and observer of what's going on in grassroots politics. So most of you, a lot of you'll probably see me around at events or will continue to do so as we, uh, well focus on less government and less taxes broadly professionally, but also I am a, uh, political observer as well. Sure. Well, thank you so much for making time to be with us, Zig. I know we have, uh, we have some big things to discuss this evening, um, but, you know, grassroots politics, when we, you know, just before we get started, when we start talking about grassroots politics, um, you know, what, how would you define that? How would you, uh, share the meaning of that? Well, how, how I would define grassroots politics is what it is that typical middle class people like you and I are most concerned with that often goes un unarticulated except for at a handful of meetings or maybe an op-ed or letter to, to, that are here and there. But it's really focusing on what it is that the majority of people want with just ordinary individuals that are seeking to get their voice out, because that often goes either overlooked or ignored by politicians in the GE General Assembly, Congress, anywhere. So, so that's why, uh, working in the grassroots and working with people in the grassroots is so important, because more often than not, people in the grassroots are fundamentally overlooked. And politicians should, quite frankly, do do a better job of taking into account what it is that, that people actually find important. You know, and, and I don't think we can, uh, ignore the fact that there is a place in politics for big money and for lobbying and for, uh, corporations to, to get involved in government. But we, as middle class Americans, as, as, uh, constituents of the commonwealth, we, we may not have the same money as, uh, as other people put into campaigns, but through grassroots activism, we can have just as much power. You know, uh, you know, I just retired from the State House and served six years there. My first campaign, um, there were a lot of people that thought, you know, Hey, this young guy, no way he can win against a tenure incumbent, uh, with name recognition, et cetera. And, you know, it was really getting out and knocking on doors and meeting with people. We knocked on over 10,000 doors in that campaign. And, uh, there are so many of those same people that, that I have gotten to know. And, uh, and really I think that's what won me the election. So it's so important for individuals to get involved in grassroots campaigning. Now, I have a couple notes that, uh, that we made before the show. And, and I know we want to get to, uh, some important topics. Uh, you know, following through a study of political philosophy at Lycoming College, great college in the middle of the Commonwealth, um, there seemed to be a major discrepancy between what the founders promised and what we have now. Why don't you go ahead and explain that to us a little bit? Yeah. And that's, that's the whole reason why it was that I chose to get involved because has somebody who, who was in the grassroots and, and, and was a student and was trying to understand the world around me more thoroughly, I came to find out and learn that all the stuff that I'm being told on, on the media or the information that I'm getting from my friends here and there, that's not what it is that, that the founders actually promised. So that's a major reason why I decided to get involved. For example, one thing that's important to note is, but most people are, are so confused about the distinction between a Republican democracy, for example, and be because of that, because of that conceptual confusion. Now people are up in arms about things like the, the, the electoral college, which actually safeguards are republic, or they, or they just don't have a, a deep understanding or respect for the constitution, because heck, even some people view the constitution as anti-democratic in some ways. So I think it's really important that people have some understanding of what it is that, uh, the, the philosophy that the founders had, so that way they can understand how it is that people are, are leadership ought to govern, right? Because you, you, you can't understand how people should, should govern if you don't have a philosophy or understanding of what it is that they're supposed to be governing. Well, let me take just a moment to kind of summarize some of the things you said and keep me honest with my listeners here. If I misspeak, don't, you know, feel free to correct me, but we're talking about a democracy, which people normally say, you know, the United States of America is a democracy. We're not a true democracy because every single decision is not voted on by every single person who is within the United States. Instead, we're a representative republic where, uh, we elect individuals to make decisions on our behalf, and, uh, we have the, uh, ability to vote them out of office at any given time at at election time, uh, if they're not serving the purposes that we've put them in place to serve. Um, so do, do I have those two distinctions? Uh. There Zig, no, no. That, that ex distinction is, uh, exactly right. In, in democracy, people de directly voted on legislation. It wasn't all people, actually, people were chosen randomly to vote in, uh, democracy, but they did directly voted on legislation. And the reason why the founders, for example, didn't want and didn't support that was because, well, for, for one, just a clear study of history and seeing how that actually led to the, uh, destruction of passed great societies, but also they, they believe that representatives could better refine and articulate the views of individual citizens. So, so that's, that's one reason, uh, why, why we have a a, a republic. And that's, that's one of the, the advantages and, and, and benefits of having a, uh, republic because our representatives are not prone to the same, um, passions, for example, that the people could be, um, throw, thrown into arms about. So it's, it's really de distinctions like that, that, uh, in understanding those things, uh, that's why it was that I chose to, to get involved so that hopefully we, we can have more conversations about our, our republic, how things should govern, and we could do so with truth and honesty and in a way that well perhaps will get us more closely to what the founders wanted in a republic. And, you know, I'm, I'm gonna make this comment with, um, at the, for the sake of, uh, clarification, I don't wanna sound like an elitist at all, because, you know, I, I served as a representative for six years. Um, but there are many times when if the average everyday middle class American was voting on every piece of legislation, they may not have all of the, um, the knowledge they need to make an educated, informed decision. Um, I always told people that being a state representative meant that you had to be a subject matter expert at absolutely every subject, because we could go from, uh, a bill on healthcare reform to, uh, a bill that is dealing with, with education in the same day. And so we had to do our research. And, and that's why, um, you know, it's a full-time position, uh, to be able to do that, because if you are attending to your family and working a nine to five job, you may not have that same amount of time, uh, to inform all the decisions that you need to make. That's right. The other thing I, I wanted to comment on, because you mentioned it was the electoral college, and, uh, and this is one of my favorite things to, to debate, but, uh, for the sake of this episode, we'll just keep it brief. You know, the electoral college is important because if it was not for the electoral college areas with massive population would really override our rural parts of America. And living in rural southwestern Pennsylvania, you know, I already see, uh, at election time, election numbers, how the County of Philadelphia and Allegheny County really lead the Commonwealth. It's almost like we need an electoral college, uh, just at the state level to, uh, to kind of rectify some of those problems. So I've said my piece for the electoral college today. Um, let's get to Constitutionality, um, yep. The importance of being, uh, someone who, who believes in the Constitution follows the Constitution. Um, talk to me a little bit about your thoughts on the Constitution and constitutionality. Well, I, I think in a lot of cases, because pe people generally f for instance, don't understand what the founder set in at the, the, the Federalist, which was used to justify the existence of the U United States Constitution because they were replacing the articles of Confederation, because people don't often understand that, then they have an o they often have a warped view of the Constitution itself, in part, not only because they, they don't know about the Federalists, but they're also choosing to read something like Marx or, uh, some other European tw, 20th century thinker that probably resented, uh, American greatness. But if, if people studied political philosophy, for example, they, they would understand that something like the, the, the Second Amendment and our right to bear arms isn't just about the right to bear arms for bearing arms' sake, or it's not, it's not that way just for fun. It's that way. Because the founders study John Locke who said, Hey, if, if we're living in a state of nature, the three things that we're gonna have basically guaranteed US rights is going to be life, liberty, and property. Those are the most reasonable things that we can ask if we're in a, a pre society. And so the, the Second Amendment is just, uh, constitutionalizing, if you will, our right to self-defense, because if we were in a state of nature before civilization, we would, we would expect anybody to have the right to defend themselves. That's what people would do. So now, because people don't under understand that they think, well, we, we oughta just be able to, to, to get rid of guns. Well, now, I mean, people have a inherent right to self-defense, and if you get rid of something like the Second Amendment, for example, people can't defend themselves. And that's worse in some ways than living in a priest civilized society. Right? Yeah. And, and when you're talking about the Second Amendment, I don't know if, uh, if everyone realizes this, I know a lot of my listeners probably do, but the Second Amendment, uh, of the US Constitution protects your right to keep and bear arms. Um, but the Pennsylvania Constitution, section 21 also talks about, uh, the right to keep and bare arms, and it's even actually, that's right, stronger in its wording than the, uh, US Constitution saying that it shall not be questioned. Um, so you have protections for, for the Second Amendment in both of those places. The First Amendment can't be ignored either. Uh, so let's talk just for a moment or so about the importance of the, the free speech and, uh, in the First Amendment. Yeah, I just, I just think that now be because people don't understand the, the, the importance of free speech and, and, and they're reading things like Marks and other po post-Modern Thinkers, um, then it's really marginalizing. It's, it's, I, so we're on, alternatively, they will only have respect for the First Amendment, insofar as it can advance things like, uh, you, you had a lot of it radical causes in the 1960s, for example. They only respected that the, the, the First Amendment insofar has, it could ad advance their causes. So if, if people were, were doing a, a, a thorough reading h the, the, the Federalist, for example, they would understand that the First Amendment is, is important because it actually helps our balance of power. It helps, uh, various factions are, are articulate well, what it is that's going on in, in society. And so having that there creates a, a set of checks and balances and competition between various factions that's needed according to our Republican system, because our, our Republican system isn't intended, for example, to create Utopia. It's intended to balance needs between various competing groups. And that's one of the things that the First Amendment is fundamentally supposed to do. In fact, without having some implicit understanding of the, the, the First Amendment, the founders themselves would've never been able to establish our republic. I mean, the whole justification for our Republic is containing the, the Federalist, which were printed in newspapers. So if that doesn't highlight the importance of civil discourse and, uh, conver conversation, I don't know what does. Y you know, Zig, we have to get to our first break here today. Um, but before we do that, I just wanna take 30 seconds. We are discussing, um, kind of our, our republic as the founders intended it. And I don't think you can do that without touching on state's rights over, uh, you know, the federal government's rights and responsibilities. So, just in 30 seconds, give us your point of view. And also, I want to say this, I know some of our listeners may disagree with this conversation. Mm. Um, because you and I both come from this, from a conservative point of view, I think we both sit on the right side of the owl. Um, but if someone disagrees, uh, I would welcome that conversation on the show as well, uh, at a future date and time. So we're not, uh, we're not saying we're absolutely correct, but from our point of view, this is what it looks like. So let's talk state's rights over the federal government's rights, and then we'll go to a quick commercial. Break. The, the, the whole reason why the founders thought that that was important was because they, they, they assumed in designing the, the, the new Constitution that people would naturally want to know what's most important in terms of local politics and, uh, state politics, because geographically, physically, that's what's closest to them, and heck, it's probably what should be closest to them, uh, because that stops a vast disagreement. So the, the whole, the whole justification behind something like state's rights is that it allows people who have local knowledge of the situation to best participate and solve problems in a way that, quite frankly, the, the federal government can't. And the founders understood that. Well, and I don't wanna open a whole can of worms here, uh, and, and take up the rest of the show with this topic, but, you know, we have issues where I think the federal government oversteps. And many times during my service, uh, as a state representative, I would have constituents ask me about the legalization of recreational marijuana or the, uh, use of medical marijuana. And of course, here in the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, it's been some time that we've had recreational, or excuse me, medical marijuana laws in place. But the federal drug schedule still lists marijuana as, uh, as a classified drug, and therefore you have issues with gun ownership and the ATF and, and so forth. And I think that's one of the areas where the federal government really, uh, kind of overstepped. And, and I think that's one of the conflicts that comes into place that our forefathers would've said, Hey, this is a state's rights issue. That's right. Yeah. Now, Zig, that's, that's exactly right. Zig, we gotta get to our first break. We'll be back on commonalities in just a moment. You are listening to commonalities where guests find common ground through uncommon conversations. We'll be back after this brief break to recognize our sponsors. Is your business using analog strategies in a digital marketing world? If so, then contact Matthew or Rebecca Dowling at Coordinated 360 for a professional consultation where we bring in-depth knowledge and functional expertise with a holistic perspective. Coordinated 360 provides digital marketing, paid ad and media buying services, web design, social media management, video production, and more for businesses, organizations, and political campaigns with decades of experience. Matt and Becky at Coordinated 360 can help you craft your unique message and share it with the world. For a no risk media evaluation and recommendations, call 7 2 4 3 2 0 22 12, or visit us online at www.coordinatedthreesixty.com. Find us also on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, or email info coordinated three sixty.com. Founded in 1991, bright Stripe has succeeded on the premises of quality work, done right at an affordable cost. At Bright Stripe personal service has always been a must. We strive to be the premier asphalt ceiling and striping company in the region. Matt George, the owner of Brights Stripe llc, brings experience from his construction and maintenance company, mountain Creek Construction and Maintenance. Matt has provided excellent customer service to many happy businesses and homeowners. Bright Stripe is the premier provider of seal coating or pavement ceiling. The process of applying a protective coating to asphalt based pavements to provide a layer of protection from the elements, water, oils, and UV damage. They also specialize in driveway and parking lot. Crack ceiling. Crack ceiling is the process of applying a protective coating to asphalt based pavements. Bright stripe also abides by all safety laws and standards in line striping and layout. For a no obligation estimate, contact Bright Stripe at 7 2 4 4 3 7 6 0 9 0. When. It comes to buying a home, what you see isn't exactly what you get. That's why home buyers should call Dave Dowling At Grandview Inspections at 7 2 4 2 0 8 4 1 0 8. You'll see colorful flowers, freshly painted walls, granite countertops, leaming, hardwood floors, and other touches. What you can't see is the cracks, ancient plumbing, dangerous wiring, or broken appliances that might be revealed when you hire a home inspector. And when it comes to home inspectors, knowing yours has the qualifications and experience needed, should be your number one concern. Dave Dowling with Grandview Inspections is an architectural engineer with over 30 years of commercial construction experience and hundreds of inspections under his belt. A home inspection is an opportunity for you to hire an expert to walk through the home and prepare a report outlining the home's major components. What needs immediate attention and what will require maintenance after you move in your home is one of your biggest investments. So make sure your investment is everything you hoped it to be. Call Dave Dowling at Grandview Inspections at 7 2 4 2 0 8 4 1 0 8. Are you enjoying the program? You're listening to support commonalities and help keep us on the air by making a donation of five, 10, or $25, or any amount you feel comfortable sharing [email protected] Again, that is donate.commonalities.online on the worldwide web. Buy our host a cup of coffee or help pay for airtime at donate dot commonalities. Online. You're listening to Commonalities on five 90 w MBS 1 0 1 0.1 fm, um, and any place you download your favorite podcast, I'm your host Matt Dowling, and my guest today is Zigman Reichenbach. Uh, Zig, you are here talking a little bit about, uh, the way our forefathers set up the country and what their intentions were. We're also talking about grassroots politics. And, uh, so my question for you is, why from a grassroots perspective, uh, finding commonalities in politics is, or seems to be so difficult? Well, b big part of the reason why it's made so difficult is because there's, there's so much perverse incentive, so, so many perverse incentives from folks in the media to in intentionally create, in, in inflammatory comments and, and remarks and headlines such that when people read them, they think that that's what their neighbors are like. I know I talked to a bunch of people in the grassroots for, for example, that didn't want to do something like canvassing because they, they were afraid of the people that would come to the door. Now, when, when you know that there's a problem when people are afraid of knocking on the door of people who are their neighbors, I mean, if, if, if that's the case, I mean, it's, it's a miracle and blessing that we even have any semblance of, of society where people even being afraid of their own neighbors because of the sens sensationalized media, right? So the point, uh, that you're making is that the media, of course, to drive up ratings for years has made stories more sensational, and they've gone either to the extreme right or the extreme left of an an issue. And, uh, therefore it's, it becomes very polarizing. Um, but, you know, one of the things we're trying to do with this show, and the reason why the show's name is commonalities, is we wanna find common ground, um, with our neighbors, with our fellows, citizens here of, uh, of the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania and the United States of America. Um, you know, uh, talk a little bit more about, um, the way fear mongering has happened within our media. Well, I think ha, having that incentive to, to to sell newspapers, uh, discourages people from just coming together and just, just talking as they used to in times past. If, if you take a look back at history, for example, the, the great probably hub, hub democracy, or even just thinking about rights, was really in coffee shops when you had a vast middle class there and ready to talk to one another, uh, about politics. So not only do, do we have fear, fear mongering in the, the, the media for, for ratings, we also don't even have hardly any space to, to find any common ground anymore there. I mean, if, if you go to a coffee shop now and you try to talk about, uh, politics with somebody, they're probably gonna look at you depending on how local the place is. But if it's somewhere like a major chain, they're gonna look at you like you're absolutely crazy. I know, because I've, uh, done it before and I've ran into some trouble. Well, one time I tried to start up a conversation with a gentleman that a, uh, restaurant. And I, I was telling him, well, what I was doing, how, how I was canvassing. He told me that he supported what it was that I was doing, but then he said he didn't want to talk about it, and then he talked about it for another 15 minutes, basically rambling to himself. I I tried to talk about it again, and then, and then he yelled at me. So that just indicates the, the confusion that people have about politics, the, the internal fear, the, the, the, the barriers that exist, there's really just, just so many barriers and fear and no common space to find that middle ground that we're really trying to get to. You know, our tagline on this show is, uh, that we talk about politics, religion, and finances, everything your grandmother told you not to talk about with friends. And my grandmother literally used to tell me, um, you know, don't bring up that conversation. Don't talk about religion, don't talk about politics, don't talk about finances. But those are the, the big issues that need discussion. And, you know, u unfortunately, we have come to a society where everyone kind of clamors up when you introduce a topic like that around the dinner table. And I think what people forget is that, that you and I, uh, could have completely different ways of solving a problem. We may even agree on the problem that we have. Let's say it's that the education system is broken. Um, you know, I think people on the left and on the right could, uh, agree that, that that's the case. Um, and there's my dog in the background. Uh, but so they could believe that there is a problem with education. They go about it by solving it two different, completely different ways. And at the end of the day, we can have a discussion. We can disagree on how to solve the problem, but what's important is that we can shake hands and break bread and still be friends afterwards. And, uh, you know, there were many nights in Harrisburg, um, you know, where I would go out to dinner on a specific topic, uh, with a company or a lobbyist, and then afterwards I would find myself, uh, enjoying a cigar or, you know, having, uh, having a drink at, uh, at an establishment in downtown. And many times I was sitting with the same Democrats that, uh, on the house floor, we may have disagreed and ly uh, debated each other, but we could come together as individuals, as people, as human beings at the end of the day. And, and, and that's what I'm trying to address through this podcast. And, uh, you know, I don't know if you have any personal experience like that where, you know, you can completely disagree with someone, but still, uh, treat them humanely and still, uh, be friends with them. No, no, that's, that's exactly right. And I, I think because people don't know the full extent of all, all the issues that are covered in the General assembly, because they're not aware of them, they're really not aware of all the different spaces that they could actually find, uh, common ground. Uh, for, for example, um, state Senator AR or Haywood is somebody that I would probably disagree with on a number of different issues, but he, he introduced a bill, and I guess I won't get into the, to the total details of it unless, unless you'd like to. But he, he introduced a, a bill that I think is, uh, most sensible when it comes to criminal justice reform. And I, I think because people don't know all the different issues out there fundamentally, or, or, or they don't even know what's going on in the, the general assembly, that they really miss out on a, a lot of good opportunities to find that common ground. It's hard, it's hard to find common ground if you don't know the ground exists. You know, uh, Senator Art Haywood, uh, he's a, he's a good man from Philadelphia. He and I probably would never agree on ev anything except maybe where to, uh, where to have lunch or where to have dinner. Uh, we did the PCN Colin show a number of times, uh, together where we would kind of spar with each other, and, uh, and we had differing points of view. Um, but, you know, that's another individual where, you know, at the end of the day, he's a human being. He's trying to do the best for his constituents, even though his ideas, um, would be very different. We do have to get to another break in just about a minute, but before we do that, you touched on criminal justice reform. Mm-hmm. And, uh, and I want to take our conversation kind of a step further, and I wanna put some blame on politicians, and I have the ability to do that because, uh, you know, I, I was a politician. I am a politician. Um, but, you know, when we campaign, we send out, uh, flyers, or we create commercials that have just small news bites or clips. And I used to say, you know, it is amazing that I could make a vote and I could vote yes or no, and whether I voted yes or no, it didn't matter because a negative mail piece could be construed, uh, from my vote either way. And we as politicians have created a culture where that's done, and it's this, uh, Mac veian kind of mentality that everything's good. Um, let's just say, because Art Haywood is, is looking at criminal justice reform, and he wants to put, put people that have served their time back to work and being productive members of society. But if I'm running against him, I'll just say he's soft on crime <laugh>. So we as politicians have really done an injustice to the voters in that regard. Zig, uh, I gotta get to our next break. When we come back, we'll be talking a little bit more about how to address these issues here within the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. You're listening to commonalities where guests find common ground through uncommon conversations. We'll be back after this brief break to recognize our sponsors. Is your business using analog strategies in a digital marketing world? If so, then contact Matthew or Rebecca Dowling at Coordinated 360 for a professional consultation where we bring in-depth knowledge and functional expertise with a holistic perspective. Coordinated 360 provides digital marketing, paid ad and media buying services, web design, social media management, video production, and more for businesses, organizations, and political campaigns with decades of experience. Matt and Becky at Coordinated 360 can help you craft your unique message and share it with the world. For a no risk media evaluation and recommendations, call 7 2 4 3 2 0 22 12, or visit us online at www.coordinatedthreesixty.com. Find us also on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, or email info coordinated three sixty.com. Founded in 1991, bright Stripe has succeeded on the premises of quality work, done right at an affordable cost. At Bright Stripe personal service has always been a must. We Stripe to be the premier asphalt ceiling and striping company in the region. Matt George, the owner of Bright Stripe llc, brings experience from his construction and maintenance company, mountain Creek Construction and Maintenance. Matt has provided excellent customer service to many happy businesses and homeowners. Brights Stripe is the premier provider of seal coating or pavement ceiling. The process of applying a protective coating to asphalt based pavements to provide a layer of protection from the elements, water, oils, and UV damage. They also specialize in driveway and parking lot. Crack ceiling. Crack ceiling is the process of applying a protective coating to asphalt based pavements. Bright stripe also abides by all safety laws and standards in line striping and layout. For a no obligation estimate, contact Bright Stripe at 7 2 4 4 3 7 6 0 9 0. When it comes to buying a home, what you see isn't exactly what you get. That's why home buyers should call Dave Dowling At Grandview Inspections at 7 2 4 2 0 8 4 1 0 8. You'll see colorful flowers, freshly painted walls, granite countertops, blaming hardwood floors and other touches. What you can't see is the cracks, ancient plumbing, dangerous wiring, or broken appliances that might be revealed when you hire a home inspector. And when it comes to home inspectors, knowing yours has the qualifications and experience needed, should be your number one concern. Dave Dowling with Grand View Inspections is an architectural engineer with over 30 years of commercial construction experience and hundreds of inspections under his belt. A home inspection is an opportunity for you to hire an expert to walk through the home and prepare a report outlining the home's major components. What needs immediate attention and what will require maintenance after you move in Your home is one of your biggest investments. So make sure your investment is everything you hoped it to be. Call Dave Dowling at Grandview Inspections at 7 2 4 2 0 8 4 1 0 8. Are you enjoying the program? You're listening to support commonalities and help keep us on the air by making a donation of five, 10, or $25, or any amount you feel comfortable sharing [email protected] Again, that is donate.commonalities.online on the worldwide web, buy our host a cup of coffee or help pay for airtime at donate dot commonalities online. Thanks for staying with us with commonalities here on w Nmb S five 90 am 1 0 1 0.1 fm. I'm your host, Matt Dowling. My guest today is Zigman Reich Bach. And, uh, Zig, we were talking a little bit about, uh, kind of what the founding fathers had in mind about some of the problems we have with a polarized society, um, and how politics really kind of just turn some people's stomachs and turn some people off to the point to where they don't even wanna have a conversation with their neighbors. Um, but I know you're doing some work to address these issues. So tell me a little bit about what you as an individual, uh, constituent of the Commonwealth are doing to, uh, to try to address these issues. Well, well, well, one thing that I just recently started doing is I, I started doing something similar to what it is that you're doing here on c commonalities with the weekly podcast called Talk, talk Politics. Every Tuesday at 8:30 PM I have individual Facebook group where I try to get a pulse of what it is that people are talking about, and then I talk about what's going on at the national level. I had some commentary and also talk about state politics, but the, the reason why that project is so important to me and why I I got involved in it is because I found that that often what's going on in the news, because I had had so so many civil conversations with great politicians and great people, was then they're not providing the, the analysis that most people are really looking for. For, for example, if, if you take the Russia, Ukraine situation, um, it seems to be the, the case that a lot of people in the media are just saying, well, this side's good, and this side's bad, and, and that's not, well, no, really, there's, there's a lot more to look into, you know, in terms of what started the conflict, um, how long the conflict has been going on in until we, we understand the, the history of the conflict, then we can't understand how to find a solution if we don't understand the history. So I, I, I do analysis on things like that. Um, and, you know, I, I think anybody really with, with the great power we have now to reach a people, more people should, should start a podcast. So that way they can have more of those, um, those, those discussions that they would have at the dinner table online with their friends and family, right? Mm-hmm. <affirmative>. So other than voting, what can the normal, uh, American citizen do, uh, to influence the, the political sphere out there? Well, they, they, they can look to become a, a influencer that themselves and try to reach out and be a leader within their community. Because what I've found in my study of history is that there has never been a single community that has ever had too many leaders. So they, they, they can look to, to start with an influence right there in their own community. Uh, also one, what they can do is they, they can forge relationships with or on lawmakers or different lawmakers. You can walk into the, uh, general assembly most days and, and have a civil conversation with just about an, any, any lawmaker. In addition to that, you, you can also start circulating and signing your own petitions about the issues that, that you care about. For example, last year when I was drinking with, uh, Americans for Prosperity, we, we did a large petition, uh, to support the Taxpayer Protection Act, which limits taxes by limiting how much the state government can spend. And you can circulate that to raise lawmaker awareness. And I think all those ways are really important. It's not voting alone that's gonna get the issues that most people care about, uh, across the finish line. It's, it's being a, a civil leader and being totally engaged in the community and, and finding those commonalities that I think is the best way to participate. So, Zig, I know you have your new radio show, uh, and you said that it's on Tuesday evenings at 8:30 PM uh, or your podcast rather. Yes, sir. Tell us how we can find that podcast, uh, and how we can engage you to learn more, uh, about what you're doing in Pennsylvania and your thoughts on the political sphere. That's right. So, well, one way that you can engage is just simply go to talk politics. There's a, there's a Facebook group right there that, that will allow you to interact with other individuals, expand your network, so that way you don't feel like you're alone when you're talking politics. And you, you can also look at the, the, the Facebook page on talk politics. And I do have a YouTube with a, a particular name. I'll make sure to send, send you that, but before the show, um, is over. And tho those are the main ways that I'm engaging people for right now. I'm looking forward to expanding that in the future. But hey, if, if you wanna have a conversation like what, what we're having with State Representative Dowling, join us on tech Politics. Well, hey, uh, my guest today has been Zigman Reichenbach. Uh, Zig, thank you so much for being with us and for sharing your thoughts and feelings with my, uh, my viewers and my listeners here today on commonalities. Thank you so much, Zig. Thank you so much. This has been commonalities, a show where guests find common ground through uncommon conversations. Copyright 2022 Coordinated 360, all public rebroadcast should be done with prior written approval from Matthew Dowling. All requests should be sent to info coordinated three sixty.com. Thank you for listening to commonalities.

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