Episode 22 – Politics in the Pennsylvania House with Rep. Ryan Warner (R) 52nd Legislative District


Episode 22 – Politics in the Pennsylvania House with Rep. Ryan Warner (R) 52nd Legislative District


This week, we are talking all things PA House with Rep. Ryan Warner. Rep. Ryan Warner brings his blue-collar roots and rural heritage to the state Capitol as the representative for the 52nd Legislative District serving parts of Fayette and Westmoreland counties. He was first elected to serve in the state House in November 2014. A native of Fayette County, Ryan and his family have been long-time members of the community, having operated a family farm and successful logging business. Ryan's community involvement also includes volunteer work with the United Way, where he organized food drives and holiday gift giving, and as an officer with the Slovak Catholic Sokol Assembly 25.

As always, Commonalities can be heard on WMBS Radio 590AM 101.1FM every Tuesday and Thursday following the 11:00 AM local, district, and statewide news; or downloaded at www.Commonalities.online and found anyplace you download your favorite podcasts.


Episode Transcript
Starting now. Commonalities where guests find common ground through uncommon conversations, politics, religion, finances, all the topics your grandmother told you not to discuss with friends. And now your host, Matthew Dowling, and today's guests on commonalities. Well, thank you for joining another episode of Commonalities. I'm your host, Matt Dowling. My guest today is someone who, uh, most of Fayette County should be familiar with my, uh, former colleague and good friend, representative Ryan Warner. Ryan, thank you so much for being on today's program. Matt, thanks so much for having me. I, I wanted to give you an opportunity at the top of the hour here to, uh, give us a little bit of a self biography. Um, you know, I, I don't know if, uh, new committee assignments, um, that you may have that you wanna share. Uh, I know that the start of the house session has been, uh, what I'll kind of call a little bit rocky and, uh, for the listeners at home. Uh, there, I always tell people there's, um, no surprises of the fact that, you know, I was a conf conservative Republican. I am a conservative Republican for the purpose of this show. I try to stay pretty neutral, um, but things just aren't the same as, uh, as when I was serving there in the house. Uh, things have definitely been a little, uh, rocky here at the start of the session. So why don't you give us a little bit of your background and maybe any committee assignments you have? Yeah, yeah. Thanks, Matt. Yeah, so this is, uh, this is my fifth term, uh, in, in the State House. I, I represent the 52nd District, which is now consolidated to just be Fayette County. It's, um, geographically, it's, it's mainly Northern Fayette County. And we did just get our committee assignments. We actually were just assigned to them today, which is, uh, as you'd mentioned it, we're off to a rough start. Here is very late to receive our, our committee assignments, but I am will be on the appropriations committee. Again, I'll be on Consumer affairs, and I will be on the Environmental and Energy Committee. So, um, you know, I, I just wanna point out to people that may not realize committee assignments, at least for the three terms that I served in the house. Um, we were generally handed out during the month of, uh, of December. And, uh, they were made official with an official meeting at that committee in early January. So you guys are, uh, kind of three months behind also, um, happening, uh, today, as our listeners are listening, but we're actually recording a day early, is the governor's budget address. And so I wanted to ask you what you think, um, although, you know, reports may be be out by the time this episode airs, what do you think or anticipate, uh, the governor is going to put in his budget address? What are his key goals or takeaways going to be? You know, Matt, you, your guess on this is as good as mine. I am, uh, I'm gonna have my ears wide open tomorrow, uh, to, uh, you know, to see what the governor has to say. I, I don't know if his, if he's gonna go the same direction as Tom Wolf, uh, now, governor Wolf, it is not much of a secret that, that each year he proposed, uh, large increases in, in spending and, and often tax increases to go along with those, uh, large spending increases. I, I don't know whether Governor Shapiro's going to try to, uh, tighten the, the so-called belt on government and, um, you know, try, try, try to reign in spending, uh, maybe lower taxes. I, I honestly, I'm not sure what to expect. I, I think this is his first address. I have to give him the, the, the benefit of the doubt for, for what he's gonna do. I, I, I would hope, uh, you, you know, look, we have a very divided government right now with, um, you know, Republicans having the majority in the Senate, Democrats having majority in, in, in house. So the, the budgeting season is going to be very, very unique. So it'll be interesting, it'll be very interesting to see what the governor proposes. So, budget related question, uh, for you, I, I've been following the fact that the courts have, uh, found the way that we fund education here in Pennsylvania, uh, to be inappropriate. And, uh, they're looking for the legislature to make a correction to that. Um, do you think that's something that Governor Shapiro will address in his budget, budget proposal, and, you know, how do you think that affects our local schools in rural Fayette County? Yeah, so that's a great point, and that, you know, that's something that I think he has to address because that's, that's the elephant in the room, right? I mean, uh, uh, education is, as you know, as a former legislator, I mean, it's the, it's the biggest pot of money for, for a budget, right? Like, it, it, it's a massive part of our budget. Uh, so I, I think the governor almost has to address this in when, when one way or the other. And, you know, I think it's, it's a question mark for, for local districts, Matt, I, and, and it all depends on a, again, the tone that the, the governor sets here with it. Uh, I have my own personal take on it. Um, I, I'm not sure, so sure, I disagree with what the, the Supreme Court ruled. I, I don't know if I say I agree that they had the authority to make that ruling, though. Um, which y you know, those are, those are two things that I think people often in politics have a trouble, um, keeping apart to say, oh, I agree with the Supreme Court ruling, because I agree with their ruling. Uh, I will say that I don't think that they had the quite, had the authority to do that. Um, but the premise of it, I, I, I do agree with that. And, and that's that public education funding in this state is not fair, right? I, I, I mean, all you have to do is look at inequalities from one school district to another. And if you're looking at public education, Matthew, there, there shouldn't be a difference, right? Like we've said this time and again, like your zip code should not dictate the level of public education you get. There really shouldn't be a difference. I I, if there's public, but in our state, we have this vast difference, right? You have inner city schools and you have rural schools that, that are struggling. Yet you have some suburban schools, you know, that have state-of-the-art AstroTurf, uh, football fields, and you have other schools that can't buy basic supplies. And that's just, that's, that needs to change. Uh, regardless of how the Supreme Court ruled the courts rule, like that, it has to change. Uh, and I think it all goes back to, you know, something that, you know, I know that we had many disc discussions about, and, and that's property taxes. And, and, and that's one of the main issues that we have with education funding, the premise of that. We, we put this on the, the, with the major part of funding on the backs of property owners and, and on local taxes. So I think we need to look at, look at a bigger, bigger picture. I, I personally always believe that schools should be funded per student, right? Like, if you're going to public school, like you, if you look at the number of students in each school, your funding should be predicated on each student. Um, I mean, I think this also opens up the door for discussions about school choice. Um, you know, there, there's, there's a whole lot that's up in the air. You could look at the, the way that other states around us do it, Virginia or, or Maryland. But, uh, I'm not saying I have the perfect answer, perfect solution for it. But one way or the other, it, it does have to change. And I do think that the governor has to address this. So let's, uh, let's kind of peel a little bit more off of the onion and go a level deeper. Um, you know, there's a couple hot, uh, button phrases that I want to, uh, have you kind of explain if you can, uh, and that that's, uh, fair funding formula and the hold harmless agreement. And then also, uh, a multi-port part question. I've not read the actual, uh, opinion of the Supreme Court's ruling. I don't know if you've had an opportunity to do that yet, but was it, uh, predicated on the, uh, uniformity clause of the Pennsylvania constitution? Because while you were saying you didn't know if the, uh, Supreme Court had the right to rule on it, I think if that was the key point that they were making is that, um, we were interfering with the uniformity clause, then I think that would give them, uh, the freedom to make a ruling, uh, on school funding. So can you expand, expand on, uh, some of those points real quick? Yeah. So y you know, when you, you mentioned hold harmless in, uh, uh, again, as a former legislate legislator in, in Fayette County, uh, you know, this was something that was important to us because it helped our schools maintain a certain level of funding, right? So we're in an area where our population is, is decreasing. We are not bringing in new people. They're, and, um, the, what I'm trying to say is the, so the, the, the tax base here is not say, uh, the same as southeastern Philadelphia, right? Um, and hold harmless basically maintains our, our funding level. Now, when you're talking about the fair funding formula, the fair funding formula, basically any new money that go into school funding basically bypasses the hold harmless funding. Um, I don't know if that, if, if I can say if, if, if there's a better way to simplify that or not. Um. Well, it, it basically, it's saying that in areas where there's population loss, they won't lose any money. But areas where there's population growth, you know, the new monies will be expanded upon, but they may be losing out on, uh, on some, yeah, you're completely correct. Rural Pennsylvania, we were worried about that hold harmless agreement, but really, it, it does, uh, create inequalities because you have students that aren't valued, or were not paying the same amount into with state funding, um, in the areas of growth. Now, where I always thought it was difficult to right the wrong of this ship was the fact that, you know, over two thirds of our school districts were in areas where the hold harmless agreement was a positive to them, where they wanted to see funding stay the same because they were seeing a decrease. So that means that less than a third of your school districts are, uh, are kind of feeling that pain. But to write that wrong, that means a huge expansion in education funding, unless you, you know, would decrease schools in our rural areas. Yeah. That, that, that's, that, that's absolutely right. Uh, you know, in the, in what you were mentioning about the, the Supreme Court, the, the rulings too is y the problem is the, see, the, the Supreme Court, when you're looking at the uniformity clause two, you're looking at it at statewide taxes, cuz the local, you could have a discrepancy in local taxes. Uh, so for example, you can look at, if you go to Allegheny County, for example, you pay a percent more on sales tax. Uh, and it's because of the, again, it's because of the property taxes, but, uh, it just goes to the bigger picture of what I've mentioned before. The whole property tax system that we use to fund schools in the state is antiquated. And, you know, regardless of whether the, the court has the jurisdiction or doesn't have the jurisdiction to do it, it, it needs to change that. That's where I'm at. And, you know, I, I think there's a third rail of, um, of politics that exists south there. And, uh, trust me, you know, I, I know having just retired in November, we get more calls and letters about property tax elimination, um, than probably any other issue. I, I know every telephone town hall I had, I could guarantee you that property tax elimination would be a question that I got on that call. Um, and Representative Frank Ryan, who, uh, is a good friend of mine, classmate of mine, he just retired. Um, but he was looking at funding, uh, education based on, uh, the taxation of people's retirements, which we don't currently tax here in Pennsylvania. And that's why I said it's kind of a third rail of the political game because a lot of the, the elderly population that stay here in Pennsylvania stay here because we don't tax those private retirement funds. Um, but I, I think what's dangerous is the fact that if, if, as we shift taxes away from property taxes to fund education, we're gonna have to find something else. And going from 6% to 7% in a sales tax simply doesn't generate the amount of revenue that we need statewide, uh, to, to eliminate or even defray the, the property taxes that people pay. No, and I, I think it's a, that's a great point. And that's often when people ask, you know, why can't we do anything about property taxes? Well, since I've been here, there have been multiple attempts, and the the failure is always at exactly what, what, what you, what you said, uh, you, you have to replace the property tax with other funding or other taxes. So, and that always, that always lies the issue, right? Some people want a higher sales tax to make up for it. Some people want a higher income tax, some people want in between. You mentioned Frank Ryan had his proposal to tax, um, re re retirement income, which I know isn't very popular with a lot of people. So that's where the discussions always felt. So, um, you know, I, and then that's what I would always tell people. I said, don't, I, if you talk to your legislators, you talk to other people, don't just tell them that you're against, uh, property taxes or gonna wanna eliminate 'em. If you're serious about it, you have to tell them, you know, well, how else would you wanna pay for the schools? Because you, you still, you, if, if you eliminated property taxes, you would not have enough money to operate your schools currently in the state. Well, we have to get to our first break, uh, representative Warner. But, uh, when we come back there, I know we have more topics to discuss, so stay with us here on commonalities. You are listening to commonalities where guests find common ground through uncommon conversations. We'll be back after this brief break to recognize our sponsors. I'm Melinda De LaRose. As an Assistant District Attorney, I've protected Fayette County families and fought to uphold our constitutional rights. As a prosecutor and trusted local attorney, I've provided victims of crime with a strong voice and put criminals behind bars. My pledge to you as judge is to follow the law, always maintain the highest ethical standards, and to run a courtroom that's respectful of your time and tax dollars. I'm Melinda de LaRose asking for your vote for Judge paid. For by Friends of Melinda de LaRose. When it comes to buying a home, what you see isn't exactly what you get. That's why home buyers should call Dave Dowling at Grandview Inspections at 7 2 4 2 0 8 4 1 0 8. You'll see colorful flowers, freshly painted walls, granite countertops, gleaming hardwood floors, and other touches. What you can't see is the cracks, ancient plumbing, dangerous wiring, or broken appliances that might be revealed when you hire a home inspector. And when it comes to home inspectors, knowing yours has the qualifications and experience needed, should be your number one concern. Dave Dowling, with Grand View Inspections, is an architectural engineer with over 30 years of commercial construction experience and hundreds of inspections under his belt. A home inspection is an opportunity for you to hire an expert to walk through the home and prepare a report outlining the home's major components. What needs immediate attention and what will require maintenance after you move in your home is one of your biggest investments. So make sure your investment is everything you hoped it to be. Call Dave Dowling at Grandview Inspections at 7 2 4 2 0 8 4 1 0 8. Is your business using analog strategies in a digital marketing world? If so, then contact Matthew or Rebecca Dowling at Coordinated 360 for a professional consultation where we bring in-depth knowledge and functional expertise with a holistic perspective. Coordinated 360 provides digital marketing, paid ad and media buying services, web design, social media management, video production, and more for businesses, organizations, and political campaigns with decades of experience. Matt and Becky at Coordinated 360 can help you craft your unique message and share it with the world. For a no risk media evaluation and recommendations, call 7 2 4 3 2 0 22 12, or visit us online at www.coordinatedthreesixty.com. Find us also on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, or email info coordinated three sixty.com. Are you enjoying the program? You're listening to support commonalities and help keep us on the air by making a donation of five 10 or $25, or any amount you feel comfortable sharing [email protected] Again, that is donate.commonalities.online on the worldwide web, buy our host a cup of coffee or help pay for airtime at donate dot commonalities online. Thanks for sticking with us here on commonalities. I'm your host, Matt Dowling, alongside my guest for today, representative Ryan Warner, who represents, uh, Northern Fayette County, the 50, uh, 52nd District. Uh, and, uh, representative Warner, you know, there was a call for a special session to take place, um, and I think a lot of us from that were sitting on the outside, uh, thought that that may have happened in January. I I think you guys thought it may have happened in January because you were showing up, uh, for scheduled days that ended up not happening. Uh, can you tell me a little bit about that call for a special session, what a special session is and what's the topic that, uh, that people want to discuss in that session? Yeah, so basically a special session can be called upon by the governor, uh, or, uh, a if half of both chambers call for one, they can call theirselves into special session. And what special sessions are, are a, uh, different set of operating rules out, out a normal session, whereas you're just focused on one topic and you basically can't bring up other topics. So you, it is basically the laser focus in on one thing, and it avoids that topic from being changed or amended in, into something else. That's not to say that, you know, something's going to definitively get passed or, uh, has to get to the Governor. It just limits the scope of what you're able to do and, and not do. So that's, that's the premise of a special session. This particular special session was called Upon, it was actually called upon by Governor Wolf, the first one, uh, prior, uh, to Governor Shapiro being sworn in. And it was for, uh, the constitutional amendment to open up the statute of limitations on for sexual abuse, childhood sexual abuse victims, and in Pennsylvania. And we were called in the session for, for three days. And, uh, unfortunately, all the representatives traveled to Harrisburg and the speaker, uh, ended up canceling session, uh, that was canceled because of the, the whole back and forth, uh, of the speakership, um, having the majority of the Republicans and Democrats swinging at, at the same time. So it, it got us off to a little bit of a, of a rocky start. And so, you know, that look back as they referred to it is, uh, is something that people have been trying to address. Uh, now for several years, members, uh, both on the Republican and the Democrat side, uh, have introduced legislation. I know of representative Jim Gregory, who is, uh, uh, a Republican representative Rozi, who, uh, who was speaker for a short period of time, repre, uh, introduced legislation. Um, and, and they were, you know, particularly looking up to, to open that statute of limitations. And, uh, I, my question to you is, do you think that, uh, that's something that will get accomplished here in the next couple months, uh, especially before budget time? Or will the priority shift to the budget and this matter kind of be left to be addressed at a later date and time? Yeah, you know, that's gonna be up to the Senate, um, because it has been sent back. I mean, it, it's in their hands now, but I, I think I do have to mention though, Matthew, when, when we were both here, uh, this constitutional amendment was actually, it was actually passed, right? So it was actually, it was passed two sessions in a row, and it was set to go to the voters for referendum as every constitutional amendment does. But it was not properly advertised by the Wolf Administration. Uh, and because of that <laugh>, the amendment legally was thought allowed to be proposed to the voter. So it actually went through the course of the le, which is very difficult to do in the first place, uh, which is why we're taking this back up again and why it would needed to be voted on yet a third time, an unprecedented third time in a row for a constitutional amendment to reach voters. In, in that area. That error would've fallen on the Secretary of State and the Department of State for not advertising properly, correct? Yes, that's correct. Yes. I mean, it was a very, I mean, there, there's no way to, to, to beat around the bush. They, they was just a very bad oversight, very bad. So, you know, we've been talking about childhood sexual, uh, abuse, and I wanna move, uh, the topic to, uh, to sexual harassment and sexual harassment by members of the General Assembly. Uh, you know, I know this has long been a problem. Uh, we have seen the Me Too movement, which has, uh, come in and has been widely, uh, applauded but also widely criticized because, um, you know, we have some colleagues in the past that have, uh, received accusations of sexual harassment, um, but then they weren't able to file any charges or to substantiate those allegations. Um, but now comes new allegations of a current sitting member, uh, a Democrat, uh, from Delaware County, I believe. And, uh, and I wanted to kind of get, get your perspective on what needs to happen, uh, should the House and the Senate be able to better police themselves and to keep their members in line whenever, um, they step, step outta line and, uh, and something like this occurs. Yeah. So yeah, I, I mean, absolutely they should be able to better police themselves, but there, there, I mean, there's, the, the, the opportunity is, is there now, uh, I I I think the difficulty here, Matthew, is that the, that the Democrats set, set a precedent. And I, I look back at, uh, justice Kavanaugh when he was being, um, during his nomination, right? And the incident period. Yeah, they're in the confirmation hearings. Uh, there was a certain precedent set there, right? Um, and we can fast forward to look at the example of what's going on in, in, in the, in the house. Um, if Representative Zabel is indeed y you know, actually done what he's been accused of doing, then yet he needs to step down. There's, there's not a, there's there, there's no question about it. Uh, I, I think at this point thing here is though, is that the Democrat party hasn't even acknowledged it, and they've known about it since, um, December, January. I don't know the they, but they've known about it for, for a few months. Uh, and you have to wonder, is it because they had a one seat majority in the house that they didn't do anything? So it's like, you know, do is it believe survivors and Me Too. I mean, that's a rally cry, but when one of their own has been accused of it, there was deafening silence. Uh, so I mean, that's my observation into it, is, is that, um, their party should be handling this the way that they handle the other accusations. That's all. Well, and, and I think there are a couple points that, that we have to make when we look at accusations of this kind. You know, w we all have a, a constitutional right to confront, uh, our accusers if, uh, if we're accused of, of committing a crime against someone. So of course, we, we want to hear Representative Sables side of the story. Um, but you know, there, there in question is, um, you know, did something happen? Did something not happen? And you know, I, I've read that he doesn't plan to step down. He plans to get help or treatment for some type of, um, uh, health issue or issues as, as some of the newspapers have reported, but they didn't say what those issues were. And I just think it's, it's a little bit concerning that you have sitting members of the house under these type of accusations. Um, and like I said, I don't think that you can automatically remove someone because they have a right to confront their accuser. Um, and, and we do want to hear their side of the story. Um, but what is, uh, or seems to be happening, I believe is a little bit troubling. Now, when we look at this from a political perspective, um, you know, I think the, the seat that Representative Zabel has, um, I know when I first came into the house, that was a seat held by a Republican, I believe, uh, and then he was elected two years later. But we've lost all of those Delaware County seats as, as Republicans. Um, you know, truth of the matter is, if the Democrats asked him to step down, that's probably not a seat that you guys as Republicans could even pick up. So I don't see a political downside, uh, to them calling out the situation and asking him to, uh, to address it and to either step down or, uh, you know, to prove his innocence. Yeah. And, and again, I I, I think that's just been the troubling thing I is that their caucus has been just completely silent on it, Matt, I, I mean, there, the, it, it was, you know, don't pay attention to the guy behind the curtain type of thing. Right? That, and, and that, that to me is a little troubling, especially when you just have a, a one seat majority. But you have to think even, you know, if you have a one seat majority, if you ask a member to step down and resign, you no longer have a majority until that seats filled. Yeah. And so it does make for, for some complications. Mm-hmm. <affirmative>, we need to get one more break in here real quick, and then when we come back, I want to talk about your personal legislative priorities, uh, for the next session and, uh, and let you kind of address some of the things that you're working on. We'll be right back on commonalities. You're listening to commonalities where guests find common ground through uncommon conversations. We'll be back after this brief break to recognize our sponsors. I'm Melinda De LaRose. As an Assistant District Attorney, I've protected Fayette County families and fought to uphold our constitutional rights. As a prosecutor and trusted local attorney, I've provided victims of crime with a strong voice and put criminals behind bars. My pledge to you as judge is to follow the law, always maintain the highest ethical standards, and to run a courtroom that's respectful of your time and tax dollars. I'm Melinda de LaRose asking for your vote for Judge paid. For by Friends of Melinda de LaRose. When it comes to buying a home, what you see isn't exactly what you get. That's why home buyers should call Dave Dowling at Grandview Inspections at 7 2 4 2 0 8 4 1 0 8. You'll see colorful flowers, freshly painted walls, granite countertops, blaming hardwood floors and other touches. What you can't see is the cracks, ancient plumbing, dangerous wiring, or broken appliances that might be revealed when you hire a home inspector. And when it comes to home inspectors, knowing yours has the qualifications and experience needed, should be your number one concern. Dave Dowling, with Grand View Inspections, is an architectural engineer with over 30 years of commercial construction experience and hundreds of inspections under his belt. A home inspection is an opportunity for you to hire an expert to walk through the home and prepare a report outlining the home's major components. What needs immediate attention and what will require maintenance after you move in your home is one of your biggest investments. So make sure your investment is everything you hoped it to be. Call Dave Dowling at Grandview Inspections at 7 2 4 2 0 8 4 1 0 8. Is your business using analog strategies in a digital marketing world? If so, then contact Matthew or Rebecca Dowling at Coordinated 360 for a professional consultation where we bring in-depth knowledge and functional expertise with a holistic perspective. Coordinated 360 provides digital marketing, paid ad and media buying services, web design, social media management, video production, and more for businesses, organizations, and political campaigns with decades of experience. Matt and Becky at Coordinated 360 can help you craft your unique message and share it with the world. For a no risk media evaluation and recommendations, call 7 2 4 3 2 0 22 12, or visit us online at www.coordinatedthreesixty.com. Find us also on Facebook, Instagram, and Twitter, or email info coordinated three sixty.com. Are you enjoying the program? You're listening to support commonalities and help keep us on the air by making a donation of five, 10, or $25, or any amount you feel comfortable sharing [email protected] Again, that is donate.commonalities.online on the worldwide web. Buy our host a cup of coffee or help pay for airtime at donate dot commonalities online. Thanks for staying with us. I'm your host, Matt Dowling, alongside our guest today, representative Ryan Warner. Uh, state representative for the northern part of Fayette County, representative Warner. Before we went to break, I said, uh, that I was gonna give you the, uh, chance to talk about your legislative priorities. Um, you know, it, it's a little harder now. Um, when I served in the house, you know, having the Republican majority and having a Republican senate, um, it wasn't easy to get legislation across the line, but at least it was our committee chairs that, uh, that could make a dec decision to run one of the Republican bills. Uh, out of committee, uh, we had speakership, which, uh, in the, the majority leader who was controlling the calendar, and then we could punt over to the Senate. So I know things will be a little bit more difficult, but what's on your radar or your agenda for, uh, the next two years? Yeah, so I, I mean, you bring up some, some great points. It, it does not, you know, not being in the majority does make things a little bit more, more difficult, but it doesn't make things impossible. I mean, having discussions with, with the, with the Senate, I mean, there will be, uh, I, I think because of this, you're gonna see a lot of, you'll, you'll see bipartisan package, uh, of bills. And, you know, having a one seat majority isn't, isn't that big of a majority in sense of the fact that you do have some moderate Democrats that, that won't be able to vote with some of the foreign left wing stuff, uh, that, that may be proposed from Philadelphia. Uh, so I, I mean, I'm gonna continue to push forward because again, the majorities can even change throughout the course of, of this session, right? So I'll keep advocating for the things that, that I've advocated for previously. Uh, I will continuously push the Taxpayer Protection Act. Uh, I, I know multiple, um, conservative and, and good government groups have this at, at the top of their list as a, as a piece of legislation that, that they push for. And, uh, uh, the Taxpayer Protection Act basically just limits the amount of money that that government can spend, uh, constrains the budgets to a percentage of population increase, uh, and, and inflation, uh, increase. Uh, I'm working on a, a package of bills right now for combating illegal immigration, uh, particularly going after sanctuary city statuses. Uh, look, fentanyl is becoming such a major, major, major issue in this country. Uh, the drug epidemic in general is a major, major issue in this country. Uh, and if the federal government isn't gonna do anything to try to stop that influx of drugs from coming up through the border, then, then I'm going to track here in Pennsylvania at least, um, because that's one of the largest sources of the drugs coming into this country, coming across the border. Uh, and I'm also working on a package of welfare, good welfare reform bills. Um, namely there's a bill I'm working on that, that deals with out-of-state E B T card spending. Uh, I mean, a lot of people would be shocked to know that there's e v t car spending in all 50 states, <laugh> and, excuse me, in some of the territories in, uh, in, in our country, uh, including Guam, <laugh>, uh, millions of dollars spent in Florida, millions of dollars spent in North Carolina, uh, millions of dollars, uh, spent a lot of vacationing areas, uh, that the taxpayers deserve to know why. Uh, so again, we'll be working on good government reforms, um, limiting spending, the illegal immigration stuff in the welfare reform, and will be some of the stuff we'll be pushing forward. Well, you know, and, and one of the bills that I had worked on and, uh, had vetoed by Governor Wolf was, uh, was one that I think would fit in nicely with the package that you were just discussing, and that was Medicaid work requirements for those that were able bodied people so that we're able-bodied people. So I hope someone picks up the baton and, and passes that. Uh, and because, um, we, we had bipartisan support whenever, uh, I had that bill. And I think it's something that a lot of people in our area of, regardless of political party would agree that, uh, that able-bodied people should go out and at least look for work. Uh, and if, if they can't find a job, uh, at least fulfill some requirements through volunteering, uh, or things of that nature. So, you know, I, that's a bill I, I hope someone picks up and, uh, and runs with, because we got it past the finish line and then, uh, got it to the governor's desk and, and it was vetoed, uh, a few years back. Yeah. Yeah. We were actually just, uh, just discussing that and discussing that it was bipartisan and, you know, you bring up a good point. It wasn't, uh, it wasn't too over the top. You were just asking people to at least search for work if they were able to body. And, uh, you know, and one thing I'll say about that Bill were a couple things we had written into it, exemptions for pretty much anything you could think of if you were a victim of domestic violence, if you were taking care of an elderly, uh, parent that was on hospice, uh, et cetera. We, we exempted all those people. And the key thing that, uh, that I wanna point out about work requirements I, is the fact that, um, you know, you have to get permission from the federal government to put those work requirements in place. And so passing this in Pennsylvania would allow us to apply, uh, for a exemption that would allow us to put those work requirements in place. And what's actually interesting is President Clinton, uh, a democrat is who allowed for that process to even happen. This was legislation from his error era that, uh, that was allowed. It was then rescinded by the Obama administration and brought back by the Trump administration. Uh, I went to DC a few times to, to work on the bill, uh, with the Trump administration. And, uh, but I I, I do think that there's a, a renewed call, uh, for, as you called 'em, good government bills. Um, we're getting to our last couple minutes here of the program. I wanna give you an opportunity to tell listeners how they can get ahold of you. I know your office in, in Mont, uh, which was your main district office, had to move or has to move. Um, so give us your contact information. Where can people find you? And if they need assistance with things like rent rebates or elderly people that went, uh, their discount on renewing their tags for their cars, um, how can they get ahold of, of your office and get that help that they need? Yeah, absolutely. So our phone number has not changed. It's still 7 2 4 4 3 7 1 1 0 5. You, you can more than welcome to give the office a call. Our main office did move because of the district changes. So we are now on Pittsburgh Street in Connellsville, so you could, you can look for us there. We wi that office isn't quite open yet. We will be ha we'll be doing an announcement here. Uh, that office will be fully opened here shortly. Our Perus office is still open Monday, Wednesday, and Friday. Uh, so, uh oh. And you can, you can also email us at our warner pa house g o p.com. Well, thank you so much, representative Warner for being our guest here on commonalities today. Lots of luck to you and, uh, and I hope you enjoy and hear some good things in, in the budget address, which is scheduled for, uh, for the morning that this episode will air. Thanks so much for being with us. Matthew. Thank you so much. This has been commonalities, a show where guests find common ground through uncommon conversations. Copyright 2022 coordinated 360, all public rebroadcast should be done with prior written approval from Matthew Dowling. All requests should be sent to [email protected] Thank you for listening to commonalities.

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